Intestinal Helminth Infections, Compliance and Effectiveness of Albendazole Treatment among CDC Workers (18-45 Years) in Tiko, South-West Region, Cameroon

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Judith Lum Ndamukong-Nyanga
Dioh Njanakea Owah
Nyanga Bernard Yunga
Desdemona Njabi Nji
Changsen Jacqueline

Abstract

Intestinal helminthes infections are among the most prevalent of chronic human infections worldwide. These infections are common among people who work under very poor conditions most of the time without protective hand gloves, shoes and uniforms in the field. A cross-sectional study was done to determine the prevalence of intestinal helminthes among Cameroon Development Cooperation (CDC) workers and their compliance to anti-helminthic treatement form November 2017 to April 2018. It involved 102 workers aged18-45 years attending CDC cottage Hospital in Tiko. A cross-sectional study was done in which demographic data and data related to predisposing factors and preventive measures was collected using a simplified questionnaire, stool samples were collected pre and post treatement. Macroscopic and microscopic examination of stool samples was carried out in the hospital laboratory. Out of 102 people, a total of 81 (79.4%) people were infected with one or more species of intestitinal helminthes and there was significant difference in the infection with respect to various helminthes species (0.004). Among the 81 infected cases, 58(71.6%) were infected with single helminth species and 23 (28.4%) were infected with more than one species (coinfection). Intestinal helminths varied significantly among the participants with prevalences of 24.5% for T. trichuris, 6,9% for Hookworm, 0.9% for S. japanicum, 24.5% for S. haematobium, 34.3% for A. lumbricoides and 7.8% for S.  mansoni (P<0.004). Out of the 40 participants who took the drug (albendazole), 32 (80%) came for retesting and disappointedly, 8 (20.00%) of the treated participants did not come.  A majority of the 32 people retested were negative (28, 87.5%) for all species of intestinal helminth parasites, 4 (12.5%) still tested positive for the parasite presence in their stool among which 2 had schistosoma haematobium, one had schistosoma mansoni and one had Ascaris lumbricoides. Workers were recommended to wear protective hand gloves, and proper working shoes in line with their work description.

Keywords:
Helminths, anti-helminthic treatment, albendazole, predisposing factors, preventive measures.

Article Details

How to Cite
Ndamukong-Nyanga, J. L., Owah, D. N., Yunga, N. B., Nji, D. N., & Jacqueline, C. (2020). Intestinal Helminth Infections, Compliance and Effectiveness of Albendazole Treatment among CDC Workers (18-45 Years) in Tiko, South-West Region, Cameroon. Archives of Current Research International, 20(3), 26-33. https://doi.org/10.9734/acri/2020/v20i330181
Section
Original Research Article

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