Assessment of Fasting Blood Glucose Level of Undergraduates in Abeokuta Ogun State Nigeria

Main Article Content

Nupo Sunday Sedodo
Olunusi Patience Abosede
O. A. Ilori
M. K. Adenekan
Ojo Mariam Idowu
A. O. Nupo
J. V. Akinlotan

Abstract

Objectives: Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) is a condition where Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) is above normal but not high enough to be considered diabetic. Impaired fasting glucose is linked with many co-morbid diseases such as obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension. The study assessed the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose concentration among undergraduates in Ogun state South-West Nigeria.

Materials and Methods: A purposive sampling technique was used to select three hundred undergraduate students willing and ready participant. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to obtain the socio-economic information of the undergraduates. Fasting blood glucose, weight, height and blood pressure were determined using glucometer, weighing scale, height meter and sphygmomanometer respectively.

Results: The result of the study showed that the prevalence of IFG among undergraduate in South West Nigeria was 11.0% (n=33) of total participants. A higher prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) was found with females than males. Body mass index of the subject reviewed that (11.0%, n=33) were underweight, (61.0%, n=183) had normal weight, (27.3%, n=82) were overweight and (0.7%, n=2) were obese.

Conclusion: In conclusion, some of the participants had abnormal FBG (11%, n=33). Nutritional program/workshop should be organized by the institutions to enable undergraduates make a healthy, responsible lifestyle choices and consume a well-balanced diet.

Keywords:
Blood glucose level, obesity, hypertension, fasting

Article Details

How to Cite
Sedodo, N. S., Abosede, O. P., Ilori, O. A., Adenekan, M. K., Idowu, O. M., Nupo, A. O., & Akinlotan, J. V. (2020). Assessment of Fasting Blood Glucose Level of Undergraduates in Abeokuta Ogun State Nigeria. Archives of Current Research International, 20(5), 42-49. https://doi.org/10.9734/acri/2020/v20i530196
Section
Original Research Article

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