Kinematic Factors of Sitting Posture for Musculoskeletal Pain in University Staff

Dhenyffer Bruna Almeida Perez

University of Middle-West –UNICENTRO, Brazil.

Bruno Sergio Portela *

University of Middle-West –UNICENTRO, Brazil.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Aims: The objective of the present study was to verify the relationship between musculoskeletal pain and kinematic factors of sitting posture in university staff at the University of Middle-West –UNICENTRO.

Methodology: The sample studied was 24 university agents from a total of 40 employees. Anthropometric data were collected by record and to assess the prevalence of pain, a standardized questionnaire was used. The employee positioning variables were: popliteal height, elbow-to-seat height, table height and thigh height. The arrangement of the workstation was also evaluated, checking the position of the computer and/or other equipment for daily use.

Results: It was found that 54.16% of the agents had some type of pain in the spine. The recommended chair seat for men would be a height of 44.3 cm and was found to be 50.2 cm, while for women the recommended height is 40.9 cm and was found to be 45.1 cm.

Conclusion: According to the results obtained, the height of the table was higher than recommended, which could perhaps justify the complaint of pain reported by university agents.

Keywords: Work posture, low back pain, civil servants


How to Cite

Perez , D. B. A., & Portela, B. S. (2024). Kinematic Factors of Sitting Posture for Musculoskeletal Pain in University Staff. Archives of Current Research International, 24(4), 98–101. https://doi.org/10.9734/acri/2024/v24i4664

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Dishman RK, Oldenburg B, O’Neal H, Shephard RJ. Worksite physical activity interventions. Am J Prev Med. 1998;15(4):344-361.

McLean L, Tingley M, Scott RN, Rickards J. Computer terminal work and the benefit of microbreaks. ApplErgon. 2001;32(3): 225-237.

Van Dieen JH, Looze MP, Hermans V. Effects of dynamic office chairs on trunk kinematics, trunk extensor EMG and spinal shrinkage. Ergonomics. 2001; 44(7): 739-750.

Milosavljevic S, Milburn PD, Knox BW. The influence of occupation on lumbar sagittal motion and posture. Ergonomics. 2005; 48(6):657-667.

Sell I. Quality of life and working conditions. Basic Occupational Medicine. 1995;5:158-175.

Pynt J, Higgs J, Mackey M. Seeking the optimal posture of the seated lumbar spine. Physiother Theory Pract. 2001; 17(1):5-21.

Corlett E.N, Manenica I. The effects and measurement of working postures. Applied Ergonomics. 1980;43:727-737.

Cecin AH, Molinar MHC, Lopes MAB. Low back pain and work: A study on the prevalence of low back pain and sciatic pain in different occupational groups. Rev. Bras. Reumatol. 1991;31(2):50-6.

Iida I. Ergonomics: Design and production. São Paulo: Blucher; 2002.

Ryan CG, Dall PM, Granat MH, Grant PM. Sitting patterns at work: Objective measurement of adherence to current recommendations. Ergonomics. 2011; 54(6):531-538.